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programs
Lava Textured Bowls for Beginners

Lava Textured Bowls for Beginners

~With Carol Zee

Event Type: Workshop

Tuition: $50

Level: Open to All Levels

Wednesday, November 18 11:00 am-3:00 pm
Members: $50/ Non-Members: $60
Supply Fee: $15

In this one day workshop, artist Carol Zee will guide you through the process of hand building bowls using a hump mold and adding texture to the outside surface with a lava rock. Your stoneware bowl will be fired and glazed at the Donkey Mill and will be ready to be picked up within two weeks after the workshop. Your bowl will be food safe and suitable for many uses. This workshop is suitable for all levels of experience including people with no prior clay experience.


Coffee Klatch and Candle Making

Coffee Klatch and Candle Making

~With Braylene Jones

Event Type: Workshop

Tuition: $15

Level: Open to All Levels

Saturday, November 14 from 9am - 11am
A social gathering for conversation, coffee drinking and candle making, using natural beeswax and soy wax.
*Includes supply. Please call to register (808) 322-3362.

The Long Journey Home

The Long Journey Home

~With Walter "Trippy" Dods

Event Type: Presentation

Cost: Free!

Celebrating Kona Coffee History
Artist Talk and Aloha Style Potluck with filmmaker Walter "Trippy" Dods
and special guest Hiroki Morinoue and Norman Sakata
Thursday, November 12 from 6 - 8pm

As part of the 45th Annual Kona Coffee Cultural Festival, DMAC is proud to host filmmaker Walter Dods as he speaks about his first full length film documentary, The Long Journey Home. This film follows the first three generations of Japanese in Kona, from the hardship of creating new coffee farms, to the discrimination they experienced during World War II. It also reveals the many triumphs the community has enjoyed, including Kona coffee's being declared a gourmet item. The story culminates with Ellison Onizuka, the world's first Asian in space who came from the coffee land in Keopu.

The Japanese Issei came to work as indentured servants in the Hawaiian Kingdom's sugar plantations. Many were horrified by the living conditions and physical abuse they suffered at the hands of the Lunas (overseers on horseback). While most Issei completed their three-year contracts, there were those who broke the rules and ran away from the plantations under the cover of darkness. Following a primitive set of directions, these runaways made their way to Kona, changed their names to hide out from the law, and went on to help pioneer the Kona coffee industry.

The Long Journey Home depicts the fighting spirit of the Japanese community in Kona and how they were able to go from indentured servitude to outer-space in just three generations. Dods stressed the film would not be possible without the help of so many Big Island residents, who "define the word aloha" and whose "overflowing generosity" gives him chicken skin. Some of the characters featured in the film include West Hawaii residents Norman Sakata, Claude Onizuka, Arthur Murata, Mitsugi Inaba, Sunao Kadooka and Hiroki Morinoue.

A Week of Activities

A Week of Activities

~With Kona Coffee Cultural Festival

Event Type: Presentation

Cost: Free!

The Donkey Mill Art Center (DMAC) welcomes the
45th Annual Kona Coffee Cultural Festival - "Sunshine in Your Cup"
Festival Dates: November 6-15, 2015

Stop by during festival week for complimentary coffee. Marvel at local coffee themed artwork in the Kona Coffee Cultural Festival Exhibit and peruse coffee merchandise in our gift shop.

Gift Shop - Open Tuesday - Saturday, 10am - 4pm
Complimentary coffee tasting, burlap bunting flags and totes, exfoliating coffee body scrub, natural coffee soaps, natural beeswax candles, local organic honey, lauhala wares and more.

Kona Coffee Cultural Festival Exhibit
Exhibit dates: November 6 - December 9, 2015
Submission of work: Oct 31 from 10am - 2pm
Express your love of coffee, create something from the coffee plant or tell a story about coffee cultural heritage through art. Reception, awards and prizes to follow. Contact donkeymill@gmail.com for info.

Lauhala Bracelets with Nanette Bell
Tuesday November 10 from 1-am - 2pm
Free activity - $8 per bracelet kit: 2 color or embellished "pahu" or "drum" bracelet designs
Made possible through the Kona Coffee Cultural Festival

Art Reception, Awards and Print Signing with Artist Jing Jing Song
Friday, November 6th, 2015 from 6-8 pm
Celebrate the arts and enjoy a potluck dinner -- Kona Brewing Company will be serving their Pipeline Porter, made with 100% Kona coffee. Winner of the Kona Coffee Art contest will be announced and prizes awarded. Critically acclaimed artist and Kona resident Jing Jing Tsong will be signing prints of Kona Coffee Cultural Festival's 45th Anniversary commemorative artwork. Free event, please bring a dish to share

Ed Kaneko Weavers Group
Weds - Sat, November 11 - 14th from 11am - 3pm
Demonstrations by local weavers group, illustrating the historical connection between coffee and lauhala weaving. Free demonstration.

Artist Talk and Aloha Style Potluck with filmmaker Walter "Trippy" Dods
with Hiroki Morinoue and Norman Sakata
Thursday, November 12 from 6 - 8pm
As part of the 45th Annual Kona Coffee Cultural Festival, DMAC is proud to host filmmaker Walter Dods as he speaks about his first full length film documentary, The Long Journey Home. Free event, please bring a dish to share.

Coffee Klatch and Candle Making
Saturday, November 14 from 9am - 11am
A social gathering for conversation, coffee drinking and candle making, using natural, local beeswax. $15 includes supply. Please call to register (808) 322-3362.

Metalsmithing

Metalsmithing

~With Kristin Mitsu Shiga

Event Type: Workshop

Tuition: $250

Level: Open to All Levels

$85/$100 Non-Member for single classes
or $250/$275 NM for all 3
Supply Fee $40 per class or $100 for all 3

Join us for one or more of these fun, focused workshops to build your metalsmithing and jewelry-making skills. Geared for beginners, each workshop introduces new concepts and techniques and yields finished pieces of jewelry. Registered students may come for "open studio" time on Wednesday and Friday from 10am - 3:30pm to complete any unfinished projects and practice the skills you have learned.

Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 10AM-4PM (with break for lunch)
Charms & Pendants
(for youth and adults age 10 and up -- youth under 16 should be accompanied by an adult who is also registered for the workshop)
Learn the basics of jewelry fabrication in one fast-paced day! Using basic hand tools, students gain experience in sawing, filing, texturing and drilling their own unique charms in copper & brass. We'll add dimension by dapping and connect elements with rivets. Various finish options will be discussed. Students will leave with a finished pendant, charm, tag or keychain of their own design.

Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 10AM-4PM (with break for lunch)
Viking Knit Chains
(for students age 16 and up -- maximum enrollment 12 students)
Learn the ancient woven chain technique called Viking Knit (or Viking Weave). Using simple tools, we will transform a single strand of fine gauge copper wire into an airy yet strong, flexible, rope-like cable. After applying a patina for an antiqued look, we'll finish off our chains with a simple but elegant, hand-forged copper s-hook clasp and copper-toned bead cones. Students will leave with a finished Viking Knit bracelet or necklace and a kit of tools and materials to make more at home.

Saturday, October 31, 2015 - 10AM-4PM (with break for lunch)
Hammered Silver Stacking Rings
(for students age 18 and up -- maximum enrollment 10 students)
Rings hold special meanings in every culture, many of them passed down for generations. Make your own hammered silver stacking bands to fit the finger(s) of your choice. Students learn accurately to measure, saw, file and texture their silver wire before silver (hard) soldering and forming them. Torch skills will be introduced during this workshop, along with polishing for the perfect finish. Students will leave with 2-3 finished silver rings.

Kristin Mitsu Shiga is the Metals/Jewelry Program Coordinator and Metals Studio Manager for the Multnomah Arts Center in Portland, Oregon. Originally from New York City, Kristin is a metalsmith who has been splitting her time between the studio and the classroom since 1992. As a maker, Kristin is deeply influenced by her participation in various collaborative events around the world, and the people she connects with through these events. Her work is featured in numerous publications, she is an active volunteer and serves on the boards of several local and national arts organizations. She has shown her work internationally, and is included in notable collections, including the Kamm Artful Teapot Collection and the Permanent Collection of the White House. See her work at www.kristinmitsushiga.com

Kristin's residency is made possible through the Hawaii Community Foundation and the Laila Twigg Smith Art Fund. The fund is intended to support projects and initiatives that afford artists opportunities to immerse themselves in new environments, to absorb different influences, and to realize fresh visions free of the issues of day-to-day survival. Residencies provide opportunities for local artists to learn from the visiting artist(s) through dynamic, engaging, meaningful interactions, which have the potential for long-term impact in the community. See more at: www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org

Family Altars

Family Altars

~With Gerald Lucena and Margaret Sheilds

Event Type: Workshop

Tuition: $45

Level: Open to All Levels

Saturday
$45 for parent and child or $25 per person includes supply kit
(Additional kits available for $5-$8)

Altars are a big part of Dia de los Muertos or the Day of the Dead celebration. In this workshop, participants will create colorful altars to honor passed loved ones using simple materials like cardboard, paper-mache and found objects.

Students are asked to bring a small box (12"x12"x12" or slightly smaller) to represent the main form of the alter (wooden shadow boxes will work as well) and a variety of mixed-media accouterments including photographs will be used to decorate the surfaces of the altar. Small figures, paper marigolds, and skulls will also be made to complete the narrative aspects of the altar. Let's honor all creative spirits that have come before. Finished altars may be part of a community display during DMAC's celebration of life, Sunday, November 1, 2015 at Daylight Mind.

Folk Art Open Studio

Folk Art Open Studio

~With self guidance

Event Type: Workshop

Tuition: Free!

Level: Open to All Levels

Saturday, October 17 from 1pm - 4pm
BYO supplies, contribute to a project in progress or purchase a colorful supply kit for $5 - $8
Tissue flowers, picado banners and more -- come make a colorful mess in preparation for the festivities to come.

Ceramic Sugar Skulls

Ceramic Sugar Skulls

~With Deborah Ozaki

Event Type: Workshop

Tuition: $35

Level: Open to All Levels

$35 per person includes supply (2 skulls)
Additional skulls available to decorate for $5 each

Sip, snack and paint sugar skulls in keepsake ceramics. Skulls will be bisque fired and ready to paint. No experience necessary.

* image by Sweet Spirits Cookie Molds which were used to create our skull forms

Sculpting Little Critters

Sculpting Little Critters

~With Esther Shimazu

Event Type: Workshop

Tuition: $150

Level: Open to All Levels

Members: $150 / Non-Members: $180 Supply: $45

We will make small hollow ceramic animals using standard handbuilding techniques. These are a riff on Pre-Columbian terra cotta dogs but with some updating and more detail and humor. Option to make them into rattles. Students need some experience, at least understanding the ceramic process and familiarity with pinchpot and coil construction. On Day 1: small seated rabbit and cat. Day 2: Fat (very) standing poi dog

Esther Shimazu was born and raised in Honolulu, Hawaii. She attended the University of Hawaii at Manoa and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where she received bachelors' and masters' degrees in fine art. She is currently a studio artist and an occasional teacher and has taught workshops at The Honolulu Museum, Penland, Anderson Ranch, Santa Fe Clay, Emily Carr Institute and Idyllwild among others.

Artist Talk & Aloha Style Potluck

Artist Talk & Aloha Style Potluck

~With David Kuraoka and Esther Shimazu

Event Type: Presentation

Cost: Free!

Saturday evening- bring a dish to share
The Donkey Mill is honored to welcome two long-time friends and esteemed artists: David Kuraoka and Esther Shimazu.

Named a Living Treasure of Hawai'i, Kuraoka is Professor of Art Emeritus at San Francisco State University, where he taught for more than 40 years and was head of the ceramics program. Early art influences included immersion in the minimalist movement. As a young artist, he chose to focus his Master of Arts studies in ceramics.

Kuraoka has developed several different bodies of work. His pieces are abstract and his style simple, clean and crisp, "California Slick". His design philosophy involves recognizing the beauty of natural forms, combined with a visual language that he believes to be universal.

Esther Shimazu was born and raised in Honolulu, and now lives in Kailua on Oahu. She attended the University of Hawaii/Manoa for her BFA and received her MFA from the University of Massachusetts/Amherst. She is a studio artist who also travels and teaches workshops.

According to Esther, clay is the ideal material for someone with durability issues, a nerdy interest in nature and history and a large expressive family. It all comes together in a perfect storm of obsessive construction, problem-solving and self-therapy. The imagery is from a messy but happy childhood in a predominantly Asian neighborhood in laid back Hawaii. The pieces are made in collaboration with clay and are voluminously hollow, nude and bald to stick to basics and their pottery origins.